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Scott Toilet Paper Mystery Question

Aug 20, 2010

We recently got this toilet paper related question from one of customers and haven’t been able to come up with an answer. We thought that our readers might be able to help! Here’s the question:

I have a old roll of Scott toilet tissue. The name on the front of the roll is spelled with only 1 T (Scot).
Do you know how old this roll of toilet tissue is? I tried to get in touch with the Kimberly Clark Corp, but no answer back from them.

Do you have any clue when this roll of toilet paper may have been made? Leave your comment below to help solve the mystery!

**UPDATE**

Kimberly Clark has responded that this toilet paper was produced in 1915! Wow! That’s an old roll!

The new & improved Toilet Paper Encyclopedia

Aug 21, 2009

Toilet Paper EncyclopediaIf you’ve visited our resource site recently, the Toilet Paper Encyclopedia, you may have noticed some changes and additions around the site. As with any encyclopedia, maintaining up-to-date and accurate information is key, and the Toilet Paper Encyclopedia is no exception.

We’ve added updates all around, including the addition of detailed environmental information, two new manufacturers (Marcal and SCA), and an “In the News” section highlighting some of our proudest moments with the Encyclopedia.

Take a look around and as always, if you have questions on anything you see or would like to see, please shoot us an email here.  In case its not obvious yet, we looove talking about toilet paper.  Thanks to everyone who has visited The Toilet Paper Encyclopedia over the years and has helped make it a huge success.  We couldn’t be prouder.

Keep on rolling!

Toilet History – “Bathroom” vs. “Toilet”

Jul 24, 2009

When did we start calling this the toilet?

When did we start calling this the toilet?

The other day my friend said to me, “Excuse me for a second while I go toilet to brush my teeth.” I thought to myself, “Gee, I hope you’re not actually brushing your teeth in the toilet water!”  This statement got me thinking – when did the nouns “toilet” and “bathroom” become interchangeable? Besides the obvious reason that the toilet is located in the bathroom, there are still plenty of cases where one says ,”I’m going to the toilet” when all he is doing is shaving, fixing his hair, or brushing his teeth.  So why in the world would one then reference or define this room by its most unpleasant feature?

Your guess is as good as mine, but this got me thinking.  What other names do people refer to that sacred room by?  According to bathroom historian Frank Muir, the toilet and/or the outhouse have at one time or another been called:
•    “House of Honor” – the ancient Israelite
•    “House of the Morning” – the ancient Egyptians
•    The “garderobe” – literally “cloakroom”
•    The necessarium/the necessary house
•    The reredorter – literally “the room at the back of the dormitory”
•    The privy/ the private place
•    The jake/ the john
•    The loo – mostly Europe/U.K.
•    The W.C. (for water closet) – mostly Europe/UK
•    Room 100 – mostly Europe
•    The lavatory
•     The closet of ease
•    The Throne
•    Countless other nouns

Who would’ve thought?  The reredorter?  The House of Morning?  I guess the “toilet” makes more sense afterall…

Whether you’re looking for toilet paper for your “toilet” or “bathroom” , remember to shop ToiletPaperWorld.com for low prices, next day shipping, and unbeatable customer service.  Not a Preferred Member?  Sign up today (for free!!) and receive 5% off of every order, every time.

Washington Post Shares History of Toilet Paper

Jun 5, 2009

At ToiletPaperWorld.com, we have a passion for toilet paper, as well as this product’s interesting history. In a recent article in the Washington Post, reporters described the unique and sometimes uncomfortable history of toilet paper. Some highlights include:

  • The first recorded use of toilet paper appears to have occurred in China around A.D. 851. After that, nothing much was written about the practice until the 14th century rolled around. During the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) special sheets of toilet tissue were fashioned for the imperial court.

  • While Chinese royalty was lucky, there were many alternative methods to using toilet paper which made themselves known around the world. Some favorites include: pages from books, newspapers, grass, hay, perfumed wool, saltwater soaked sponges, corn cobs, lace, leaves, and the frayed ends of old anchor cable.

  • TP finally came on the scene in 1857, when Joseph Gayetty sold medicated paper packages. Though this didn’t quite catch on, it did set the stage for a company we now know and love: Scott. In 1890, Scott Co. came out with the first edition of household toilet paper, which has since developed into the soft sheets we now know today.

To learn more about the unique history of toilet paper, be sure to check out ToiletPaperWorld.com’s official Toilet Paper Encyclopedia.

The Toilet Paper Encyclopedia

Jun 3, 2009

When my father launched ToiletPaperWorld.com in 2001, a PR company suggested he write a short history of toilet paper as a marketing ploy….well, the King of Toilet Paper doesn’t take his top product lightly.

This short blurb turned into a much bigger deal. From history dating back to ancient China, to detailed descriptions and comparisons of the ttoilet paper encyclopediaop toilet paper manufacturers, to funny stories about this bathroom supply, more and more information was added. Finally it grew so large, it needed to be hosted on it’s own separate website- hence the Toilet Paper Encyclopedia was born.

There is a TON of great information on this site. Whether you’re doing research for a project or just filling up some spare time in between trips to the throne, check it out. See something you think is interesting that’s not on the site or have questions about anything toilet paper? Shoot my dad, Kenn, an email here. He loves to talk about TP. You can only imagine what bring your dad to school day was like for me growing up….

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